Wayne Terwilliger
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Terwilliger Bunts One: chapter outline

ANCIENT HISTORY AND CURRENT EVENTS (Introduction)
Enthusiasm and hard work would make young Wayne Terwilliger's dream come true: playing second base in the major leagues. The game has been his life, and at 80, he's still successful.

IVAN THE TERRIBLE, TIGERS AND MOM (1925-42)
Wayne was a mama's boy, reciting poetry and taking violin lessons, until he discovered baseball. He practiced his fielding skills endlessly, then was a three-sport athlete.

THE FALL OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION (1942)
In his first semester of college, Twig flunked a course, making him ineligible to play baseball. When the professor wouldn't change the grade, Twig enlisted in the Marines.

SAN DIEGO TO SURIBACHI-A GUNG-HO MARINE (1943-46)
In an amphibious tank, Twig was part of the assault landing forces at Saipan, Tinian and Iwo Jima. He worked hard and fought hard, and when he got the chance, he played baseball.

PRIMITIVE SAVAGERY, OR FLYING WITH ANGELS (1946-49)
Signed in 1948 by the Chicago Cubs, Twig had a disastrous season at Des Moines, but his enthusiasm earned him a start with the 1949 Triple-A Los Angeles Angels. He played like a future All-Star, and by August he was called up to Chicago.

STAN MUSIAL KNOWS MY NAME! (1949-51)
On the same field with boyhood heroes and legends of the game, Twig was in awe, but he was equal to the task and even set a rookie record shared by Ted Williams.

PLAYING IN JACKIE'S SHOES (1951-52)
Twig's job: play behind Jackie Robinson. He hated sitting on the bench, but was honored just to be there. In '52, Twig played with the Triple-A St. Paul Saints, whose stadium had rats as big as rabbits.

'ISN'T THAT TERWILLIGER PLAYING GRAND BALL?' (1953-54)
As a Senator, Twig got memorable hits off Whitey Ford, Satchel Paige and Bobo Newsom, contributed to lots of wins, earned a compliment from President Eisenhower and took a private batting lesson from Ted Williams.

'GET ON THE BUS, YOU'RE COMING WITH US' (1955-57)
Twig was playing well for the Giants' winning Triple-A Minneapolis Millers. When the Giants came in for a June exhibition game, manager Leo Durocher added Twig to his roster. Twig enjoyed being a celebrity in New York, was proud to be a teammate of Willie Mays, and learned how the Giants stole signs. He rejoined the Millers for '56 and '57.

SHORT BAT AND SHOWER SHOES (1956-57)
During winter ball near Maracaibo, Venezuela, oil came out of the showerheads. In the Dominican Republic, when dictator Rafael Trujillo came to a game nobody got rowdy.

NOT QUITE A TIGER (1958)
Playing for Charleston, W.Va., against the Saints and the Millers, Twig had a great year; he was American Association's MVP and Charleston won the championship.

BETTER HIDE THE WATCHES (1959-60)
Twig played for the streaky Kansas City Athletics; teammates included Roger Maris and other future Yankee stars. A sore back ended his playing days.

THE WHOLE SHEBANG (1961-68)
Twig always managed the same way: get a lead and pour it on. He loved strategy and helping young players develop. Life in the minors involves surprises, too-odd accommodations, temperamental players, and sometimes losing more than you win.

TED SAID (1969-72)
Ted Williams, new manager of the Washington Senators, chose Twig as his third-base coach and gave him unusual responsibilities. Off the field, Ted had opinions about everything.

UP AND DOWN WITH THE RANGERS (1973-85)
Twig managed a series of Rangers teams, then became a coach with the big-league club. Don Zimmer was the best manager Twig ever worked for; one of his successors was the worst.

AT HOME IN THE DOME (1986-94)
The surprising Twins won two hard-fought World Series championships in the deafening roar of the Metrodome. He tells clubhouse stories about Kirby Puckett, Kent Hrbek, Chuck Knoblauch and others and laments the way he was fired.

WE NEEDED THE PANTS (1995-2002)
Amid zany stunts and fans who prefer "Rebel Baseball" to the major leagues, Twig worked with future major leaguers including J.D. Drew, whom he pegged as "the next Mantle." Darryl Strawberry's swing was awe-inspiring and 14-hour bus rides to Canada just plain awful.

TOO YOUNG TO RETIRE (2003-present)
Twig managed the Ft. Worth Cats to the post-season playoffs in his first season, and to the league championship in 2005, using the approach he developed back in 1961: good pitching and speed on the bases. He drew national attention as the only man besides Connie Mack to manage after his 80th birthday.

'NUF SAID
Closing thoughts about baseball (then vs. now, majors vs. minors, etc.) as well as age, mortality, women, fame and achieving your dreams.

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